An An Interview with Thomas Hark, a 2017 Corps Legacy Achievement Awardee

Thomas Hark, formerly of Vermont Youth Conservation Corps, is a 2017 Corps Legacy Achivement Award Winner. We interviewed Thomas to learn more about him and his experience in the Corps movement. Click here to read his bio. 
 


Tell us a little bit about your background, where you come from.

I grew up in Minnesota and in my junior year of college took a summer job with the federal YCC program in Young Harris Georgia.  I had offers at 19 national parks but was oddly drawn to this small, indiscrete, operation in northern Georgia.  It changed the course of my life.

 

How did you become involved in Service and Conservation Corps? What were you doing before?

I thought I would return the next year to the federal YCC program and direct a camp of my own.  However, that year President Reagan froze federal funds and all but eliminated the YCC program.  I was shocked. 

An idea kept rolling around in my head and soon turned into a graduate thesis:  What are the necessary and critical elements to creating a public-private YCC program. I believed it was possible and was determined to prove it.

I graduated from college and took a job directing the Minnesota YCC summer program and when I learned that Minnesota would be hosting a national meeting on how to start a YCC I immediately and enthusiastically signed up. 

My application was rejected as I was an under employed college graduate with no professional experience to my name.  Yes, I had enthusiasm and passion but truly nothing else.  However, the night before the conference I got a call.  Organizers needed someone to pick guests up at airport and drive them 40 miles to the Wilder Conference center.  I jumped!

I was able to meet everyone who had anything do with YCCs at the time…legendary Robert Burkhart from the SFCC, Joanna Lennon from East May YCC and many others.

I also met an individual from Vermont, Peter Comart, who was there because a piece of legislation just passed with a one dollar appropriation and he wanted to learn how to put one of these programs together. Suffice it to say I overwhelmed him with passion and enthusiasm.

It was a match made in heaven.  I didn’t need much being hungry for a job and he did not have much to offer, outside an opportunity.  However, I had ideas and a plan, untested, and perhaps a little crazy.  They were game and promised all their support.  A few months later I was in Vermont.

One dollar.  No desk.  No phone. While I was wildly excited as it felt like the opportunity of a lifetime, the state agency apparently did not know I was even coming, as of course a one dollar appropriation was not much of a mandate.

I landed in May 10th and had my first 5 Enrollees working by mid-June.  I thought I would say a few years and then go home to Minnesota. 

However, what happened was significant growth every year, an outlet for endless creativity and experimentation, and an enormous amount of fun…25 years later I realized I was not going anywhere.  I loved Vermont.  VYCC was my vocation.  While I didn’t make much of a paycheck, I absolutely loved my work.  I literally pinched myself some nights after working 12+ hours, as I left work, thinking how it was possible to be so happy!

That one dollar was eventually, over thirty years leveraged to more than 50,000,000 dollars, more than 6000 alumni, and a 400 acre campus and to die for training center.

However, what was so cool was to have work that mattered and where every day I could see the positive life-changing impacts on the lives of others be they enrollees, staff, or others in the community, similar to my initial YCC experience in Georgia.

Part of the driving force was to emulate my hero, Liz Cornish, the camp director that hired me against her better judgment, supported me, challenged me, and in the process changed my life. I never forgot and I always have tried to live up to her example.

 

Who are some of your heroes? What did they do to inspire you?

Liz Cornish, the Camp Director in Young Harris YCC.  She was an incredibly talented Outward Bound Instructor who knew how to build teams by bringing the best out of each person.  She pushed me to my absolute limits and in the process created in me a hunger to help do the same for others.

 

Describe some of your most memorable experiences working in youth development.

The Mission of VYCC was for each member of the organization to fully embrace, adopt, and live by the idea of taking personal responsibility for all of their actions, what they say and what they do….

A young women was fired.  She was having an “exclusive” relationship which was prohibited as the goal was for each crew of incredibly diverse individuals in the short month long residential experience, to truly get to know each other and build a strong community.  Something not possible if two people spent all their time together and in so doing were not part of the community.

She could not have disagreed more with this rule.  However, she knew going in what was expected, she had had chances, and now VYCC was following through. She was sent home.

Several months afterwards I received a letter saying she still strongly disagreed with the rule…and she was angry…however, not because of this rule.  She went on to explain that upon her return this idea of personal responsibility that was woven into every aspect of VYCC life had just stuck with her, she couldn’t shake it.  And thus her whole life had changed.  Everyone in her life seemed different as no one seemed to take responsibility for anything.  It was incredibly disturbing.  She could never go back to being like them as VYCC had changed her.

She still didn’t like the rule but she was so thankful for the experience as this one idea around personal responsibility was empowering.  She was now in control.  She made decisions and good or bad, she owned them.  She felt like a whole new person. And she was.

 

Given your experience, what is the primary piece of wisdom you would give to a young person currently enrolled in a Corps?

Whatever you do, give it everything you have, or get out. It is your choice. It really is.

 

What is the primary piece of advice you would give to staff at Corps?

A poem by Marge Percy was recited by Robert Burkhart at the opening session of that conference in Minnesota on how to start a Corps.  The poem was entitled “To be of Use. A line in said “The work of the world is as common as mud…done well it is a Hopi vase that holds water and satisfies thirst for centuries…done poorly it becomes falls apart becoming dust…

Whatever you do.  Dot it with all your heart. Do it as well as you possibly can.  Take joy in it. Have passion. Have fun with it.  Take chances.  Don’t be afraid to fail. Embrace your successes and failures as just two sides of the same coin treating both the same.  Keep moving forward as hard as it can be at times.

This is what I have shared countless times.

 

In the future, what developments would you like to see happen in the Corps movement?

What I told folks when I first came to Vermont was that I believed every young Vermonter who wanted to have this experience should.  This belief drove everything I did.

I now have expanded my view.  I believe every young adult in our Nation who wants to work hard, make a difference, and grow as a person should have this opportunity. 

When I left VYCC I took some time to think and reflect and my conclusion was that this is powerful important work.  More, we live in a time where it is absolutely crucial that we instill character, virtue, practical wisdom, and what I call bed rock American values in every young American.  As we do, we will change our Country.  We can again become that shining city on the hill.  A beacon again for all the world.

 

What do you hope your legacy will be?

I set out to test an idea.  That idea was to create a successful public-private venture that, based on quality outcomes, and a solid business model, would last the test of time, providing these incredible life changing experiences, called YCC, to generation after generation.  A model that would withstand whatever political winds happened to be blowing.  A model that would teach practical leadership skills so that every alumni would make a difference for their own family, place of work, community and state, and through this nation. 

Each of us has it in us to change the world, or at least our small corner of it. Let’s do that!

 

An Interview with Len Price, a 2016 Corps Legacy Achievement Award Winner

Len Price of Conservation Corps Minnesota & Iowa was selected as a 2016 Corps Legacy Achivement Award Winner. We interviewed Len to learn more about him and his experience in the Corps movement. Click here to read Len's bio. 
 


How did you become involved in Service and Conservation Corps?  What were you doing before?

My knowledge of the Conservation Corps did not occur until my Legislative days. In the 1990s, the Corps ( known then as MCC or Minnesota Conservation Corps) was part of the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR) and as such was funded through the budgeting process for that State Agency. As a committee member of the Minnesota State Senate Finance Division that had jurisdiction over that budget, I heard about the program and supported its funding. In the state budget proposal for the 2001-2003 budget there was no funding offered for the Minnesota Conservation Corps. I was approached by Corps members at one of my senate Legislative Town meetings to try to figure out how to prevent the proposed cut to the funding and in essence end the Corps’ existence.

I was then Chairman of the Senate Finance Division for Natural Resources and championed the Corps funding and held the position through the Legislative process and conference committee  for the State Budget and the Corps emerged with funding to keep it intact as a 501 c 3 nonprofit and saved from extinction.

I was not reelected to the State Senate in the next election (2002), and  was asked to join the Corps Board of Directors in 2003. With a bleak outlook for funding, the Executive Director for the Corps left.  I was asked to apply for the position, was hired, and began work as the Executive Director in January of 2005. I am retiring December 31, 2015 after 11 years of service.

Prior to the ED position at the Corps (2005-2011), I was a classroom teacher at a suburban high school for 34 years (1965-1999) and concurrently a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives and Senate for 20 years (1983-2002). I have always had an interest in youth issues-employment and training. The Corps work seemed like a good fit.

 

Who are some of your heroes?  What did they do to inspire you? 

Among my heroes are my parents, both hard working Greatest Generation individuals who lived through the Great Depression and World War Two. They gave me the values and ethics that have guided my life. The late Minnesota State Representative Willard Munger gave me the inspiration and tenacity to use the legislative process to help protect and sustain natural resources. I was also inspired by President John Kennedy’s challenge, “Ask not what your country can do for you, but what you can do for your country”. I took that to heart and became a social studies teacher.

 

Describe some of your most memorable experiences working with Corps programs.

Every day there are memorable experiences associated with the Corps and Corps’ programs. To see first hand the change in youth and young adults after their term of service or completion of a project or a days’ work provides me with great satisfaction. To give individuals a chance to have new experiences outdoors and be involved in a tactile manner; to see the personal growth, the skill changes, the attitude changes and the appreciation of caring for the environment and each other; and the improvements made to a stream, trail, shoreline, forest, landscape, or a public place and the team spirit that develops in the process provides me with a very warm feeling. As an example, I’ll not forget the day a crew of six teenagers, including two deaf corps members, successfully and safely dismantled a problematic beaver dam in the Minnesota wilderness. They carefully and strategically repositioned themselves in order to extract each carefully constructed stick in the beaver dam. They emerged from the water coated with mud, filthy and smelling like the rank water in which they toiled for about 45 minutes. The joy on their faces of such an accomplishment is etched in my mind. They wore the mud proudly like medals for the rest of the day. Together with their crew companions they had experienced a once in a life time activity. The face of the crew leader reflected the elation of a job well done…of what a successful day had become.

 

Given your experience, what is the primary piece of wisdom you could provide to Corpsmembers?

As a corpsmember, remember it is okay to ask questions, to learn new things, to be supportive of team members, and to relish the new things that you can experience. You are not alone in not knowing. Embrace the chance, the adventure and be supportive of others.

 

What is the primary piece of wisdom you would provide to staff at Corps?

As a staff person, you have the chance to influence your charges, your crew, in so many ways. You are a mentor, a role model, an authority figure, a counselor, and an influence for life. Ask participants in programs from the past and they will likely share the profound ways that you affected them emotionally. Staff in leadership positions, carry the burden of perpetuating the reputation of the Corps movement and sometimes the sustainability of the Corps mission. It is you that must take up the mantle for the future of the Corps and national service- you must be an advocate, an educator to the public, that does not know or understand what the Corps is and what impacts it has on individual lives and the social good and value-added that Corps programs produce. You must be the storyteller and the role model.

 

In the future, what developments would you like to see happen in the Corps movement?

If I were king, I would require all high school graduates and school drop-outs to serve at least one year of service in a community and service activity before they pursue post- secondary schooling or work related training. Ideally it would not necessarily need to be just in the natural resource world. It would allow time for many young people to have some world experience, grow up a bit, and help many worthy causes and the needs of communities. Exception to the requirement would be for military service. As king I would not hesitate to provide the necessary funding to make such a worthy and noble cause become reality.

 

What do you hope your legacy will be?

I hope my legacy is that I was part of caring for others and my community and that programs like Corps will be in existence for opportunities forever. Participation to that end will help us take care of public places and spaces and” restore resources and change lives”.

 

 

An Interview with Dwight Washabaugh, a 2016 Corps Legacy Achievement Award Winner

Dwight Washabaugh of Sacramento Regional Conservation Corps was selected as a 2016 Corps Legacy Achivement Award Winner. We interviewed Dwight to learn more about him and his experience in the Corps movement. Click here to read Dwight's bio. 
 


How did you become involved in Service and Conservation Corps?  What were you doing before?

For 20 plus years prior to being involved with Service and Conservation Corps, I had been the Controller, Director of Development and Executive Director for a faith based organization. Next I did independent consulting for nonprofit organization for 3+ years facilitating strategic planning, consulting related to data management and serving as a contract administrator for a nonprofit organization.

While it is unheard of in today’s world, I was reviewing the job classified ads in two northern California newspapers and found the Sacramento Regional (Local at that time) Conservation Corps was seeking an Executive Director.  The combination of working with youth and the environment peeked my interest and I applied; and thirty days later I was offered the position and began a steep learning curve with a wonderful 21+ year career until I retired March 31, 2015.

 

Who are some of your heroes?  What did they do to inspire you?

Two groups:

  • Historical

Jesus – Inspired by his teachings and his actions.

Abraham Lincoln – Inspired by his leadership skills and determined focus.

  • Personal

A.     Business man and board member in my first nonprofit experience who when he graduated with his MBA from Harvard, his goal was to be president over the years of 10 different companies.  He has accomplished that goal.  I was inspired by his combined focus of the mission of the organization and the bottom line to create a successful organization and program.

B.     Ira Okun and Bruce Saito within the Corps movement:  I was inspired by both men as they helped me with the steep learning curve of directing a Corps and building relationships with government leaders.

 

Describe some of your most memorable experiences working with Corps programs.

My most memorable experiences occurred between me and the corpsmembers.  Topping the list were the opportunities to hear their stories about how they grew and were successful during their participation in the Corps program.  These experiences were much greater than the mere statistical accomplishments.  Their successes brought deep convictions of change in their lives, which also brought a richness to our community and to my personal experience.

 

Given your experience, what is the primary piece of wisdom you could provide to Corpsmembers?

I would share with corpsmembers the importance of letting go of the past and to focus on the opportunities they can achieve going forward. Be proud of who you are and strive to do your very best in every endeavor.  Begin by investing the time in the Corps program and   opportunities that are available to you, and participate fully.  Be honest with yourself and others.

 

What is the primary piece of wisdom you would provide to staff at Corps?

Work as a team to provide a strong, viable and meaningful program that supports, encourages and challenges each corpsmember participant.  Demonstrate to the Corpsmembers that each staff member cares.  Each staff member must “model” him/herself in his/herself day-to-day actions as a professional, caring person and leader.  Actions speak louder than words.

 

In the future, what developments would you like to see happen in the Corps movement?

The Corps movement today and the original Civilian Conservation Corps of the Depression era is a well kept public secret.  I would like to see a comprehensive ongoing National marketing plan using television, bill boards, newspapers and social media that spreads the word about Service and Conservation Corps and the multiple benefits to every community.

Secondly, I would like to see federal funding, similar to that of Job Corps for Service and Conservation Corps that would compliment State and local funded work training and service projects.

 

What do you hope your legacy will be?

My hope is that my legacy has built a strong foundation for the continued growth of the Sacramento Regional Conservation Corps as a significant part of the community fabric serving young men and women in the region with training and education while providing a meaningful workforce for important urban conservation and environmental needs.

 

The Corps Network Announces 2016 Winners of Corpsmember of the Year, Project of the Year, and Legacy Achievement Awards

 

WASHINGTON, DC (December 7, 2015)— The Corps Network has announced the winners of the 2016 Corpsmember of the Year Award, Project of the Year Award, and Legacy Achievement Award. The Corps Network presents these three awards on an annual basis to select individuals and organizations from their membership of 120 Service and Conservation Corps across the country. Awardees are chosen through a rigorous application process.

The Corps Network's 2015 Award Winners


 

Every year, The Corps Network honors a select group of outstanding Corpsmembers and Projects, as well as leaders in the Corps movement. Click the links below to read about our 2015 honorees, who will be officially awarded at our National Conference in Washington, D.C., February 8 - 11, 2015. Congratulations to all of our winners and thank you for everything you do!


Corpsmembers of the Year 

Graciela "Gracie" Billingsley 
Rocky Mountain Youth Corps, Colorado - Steamboat Springs, CO

Harris Cox
Civicorps - Oakland, CA

Mokhtar Mohammadi
Onondaga Earth Corps - Syracuse, NY

Jasmine Romero
Rocky Mountain Youth Corps, New Mexico - Taos, NM

Jeremiah Ruiz
Urban Corps of San Diego County - San Diego, CA

 

  • Click here to learn more about the award.
  • Click here for a list of past Corpsmembers of the Year.
     

Corps Legacy Achievement Award Winners

Ann Cochrane
San Francisco Conservation Corps

Paul McLain-Lugowski
Fresno EOC Local Conservation Corps

 

  • Click here to learn more about the award.
  • Click here for a list of past Corps Legacy Achievement Award winners.
     

Projects of the Year

Beach Buddy Adventure
Sacramento Regional Conservation Corps

Energy Corps
California Conservation Corps

GURLS Corps!
SEEDS 

 

2015 Corps Legacy Achievement Award Winner - Paul McLain-Lugowski

Paul McLain-Lugowski
Fresno EOC Local Conservation Corps


Click here to read an Interview with Paul *

Paul McLain-Lugowski has been an important figure in the Corps movement for the past 20 years. In 1995, Paul founded Fresno EOC Local Conservation Corps (LCC) as well as the first YouthBuild program among California Corps. Since then, LCC has helped transform the lives of thousands of opportunity youth. 

Under Paul’s leadership, LCC generated an annual budget of nearly $9 million, enrolled over 350 Corpsmembers every year, and maintained a $3 million Fee-for-Service portfolio that provided Corpsmembers with vocational training opportunities in grounds maintenance, irrigation and concrete. Through LCC, Paul also introduced and led the state in re-entry initiatives for formerly incarcerated youth. Consequently, LCC has been awarded more contracts in this area than any other Corps or YouthBuild program in the country. 

Throughout his tenure, Paul helped LCC develop a glowing reputation in the community and expand its capacity to provide educational and service opportunities to at-risk young people. In 2010, LCC was awarded a Project of the Year Award for the development of their new campus: the $16 million, 60,000 square-foot Rev. Edward L. Swillis Neighborhood Youth Center. Paul envisioned, directed, and led the fund development for this project.

Paul has held numerous leadership positions in the Corps world. From 1998 – 2000, he served as the third President of the California Association of Local Conservation Corps (CALCC), presiding over the organization when its recycling allocation doubled to $18 million. He served two consecutive terms as President of the California YouthBuild Coaltion (2005 – 2009); served as a board member of the National Association of Service and Conservation Corps (2004 - 2006); and, since 2002, has chaired the board of California’s Conservation Corps Museum.

Though Paul no longer serves as Director of LCC, his commitment to the Corps and to young people endures. Over the past five years, Paul created, and continues to lead, the Planning Office for LCC’s parent organization, Fresno EOC (which is the nation’s largest community action agency). He convinced Rep. Jim Costa (a strong supporter of Paul’s nomination for this award) to co-sponsor the Youth Corps Act of 2011, and continues to pursue California state and federal representatives to support important Corps initiatives. Paul is also a regular speaker on Corps-related matters, presenting to HUD, Inside-Out Summits, California State Assembly hearings, State Workforce Association Conferences, National Transitional Jobs Network, and the National Community Action Partnership. In his spare time, Paul also continues to formally and informally mentor many LCC Corpsmembers.

Shawn Riggins, current Director of LCC, said, “Paul’s passion for the Corps is without limit…It is not easy to follow in the footsteps of a giant.”  

2015 Corps Legacy Achievement Award Winner - Ann Cochrane

Ann Cochrane
San Francisco Conservation Corps


Click here to read an Interview with Ann *

Ann Cochrane began her tenure with San Francisco Conservation Corps (SFCC) in 1988, taking over as Executive Director in 1993. Now, as she enters retirement after 26 years as a champion of Corps and a prominent figure in the world of youth development, Ann can be recognized as one of the longest serving Conservation Corps Directors in the country. 

Ann holds a B.A. in Sociology and Law from Boston University and has also completed course work in Early Childhood Education at San Francisco State University and City College of San Francisco. Prior to joining SFCC, Ann served as Executive Director of the Chinatown Community Children’s Center. During her time with the Corps, Ann also held multiple leadership positions with other organizations focused on youth development. She served on the boards of the California Association of Local Conservation Corps (CALCC), and Wu Yee’s Children’s Services in San Francisco, and served on the Youth Council of the Workforce Investment Board of San Francisco. Ann has also volunteered her time as a Client Advocate for W.O.M.A.N., Inc., and as a Legal Advocate for the Family Violence Prevention Project.

Ann served on the Board and Corps Council of NASCC/The Corps Network for 12 years, acting as the Board President in the 1990s and helping steer NASCC through changing times. In the 2000s, Ann served as the first Treasurer of the newly restructured Board.

During her tenure, Ann has helped thousands of young people change their lives through participation in SFCC and, by extension, the many other Corps that have modeled themselves off of SFCC’s urban conservation Corps model.

“Ann has brought consistent and steady leadership to the San Francisco Conservation Corps and the national Corps movement for more than 25 years,” said Harry Bruell, CEO and President of Conservation Legacy. “Her upcoming retirement is a true loss of one of the first leaders of the Corps movement.”

An Interview with Scott Weaver, a 2014 Corps Legacy Achievement Award Winner


An Interview with Scott Weaver

This year, we at The Corps Network interviewed our three 2014 Corps Legacy Achievement Award winners to learn more about their experience and history in the Corps movement. 

Read Scott's Bio


How did you become involved in the world of Service and Conservation Corps?

I came out of 9 years working for the National Park Service – where I met and played guitars with David Muraki when he worked with the Yosemite Institute where I met my wife, Kathy - in which I helped oversee and coordinate visiting SCA crews, which led to me starting to work for SCA itself in 1978. When Reagan ended funding for service organizations and crews in the early 80’s, I worked with SCA’s then Vice President, Scott Izzo, in a meeting in Florida (in 1984??) which led to the creation of NASCC which later changed its name to TCN. Much later in time, I worked with Mary Ellen and Harry Bruell to create the Public Lands Service Coalition for which I have served on their Executive Leadership Group ever since.


Who are some of your heroes? What did they do to inspire you?

Diane Feinstein for having created the original San Francisco Conservation Corps and its first Executive Director Robert Burckhardt. Jerry Brown for having started the California Conservation Corps. 


What are some of your most memorable experiences from working with Corps programs?

I enjoyed coordinating SCA crews when I worked for NPS in Yosemite. I then enjoyed working with Destry Jarvis in assisting his work with Congress (he worked as SCA’s Executive VP then) in creating the legislation which created the Public Lands Corps Authority, and then eventually creating the Public Lands Service Coalition comprised of Corps. In the interim, I enjoyed creating huge muliti-Corps initiatives such as the Greater Yellowstone Recovery Corps after the huge fires in the 80’s and the Mount Rainier Recovery Corps after the huge floods destroyed much of the park’s trails. Lastly, it was greatly rewarding that all 3 of my childrens did SCA high school crews and SCA internships. My oldest son when on to work for the Park Service (even in Yosemite where his parents served and met) and eventually was the crew leader for 6 SCA high school crews of his own! (he outdid his Dad!)…


Which of your accomplishments as a leader in the Corps Movement are you most proud of?

Having helped establish the Greater Yellowstone Recovery Corps, the Mount Rainier Recovery Corps, and the Public Lands Service Coalition. Also enjoyed helping to establish NASCC which became TCN and the legislation creating the Public Land Corps.


Given your experience, what is the primary piece of wisdom you could provide to Corpsmembers?

Don’t give in to your initial fears, reach out to your fellow Corps Members who will become lifetime friends, learn the value and gratification of service, and just open yourself up to new experiences and friends.


Among the many possibilities, what is the primary piece of wisdom you could provide to staff members at Corps?

You will learn as much and perhaps even more from your Corps members than they will learn from you if you just completely open yourself up to helping them grow as individuals.


Ten or twenty years from now, what developments would you like to have taken place in the Corps Movement?

I hope our current effort to establish the 21st Century Conservation Service Corps continues to establish ongoing funding and support so that it grows to the size and financial stability of the original CCC’s of the 1930’s.


If any celebrity or public figure were to become an advocate for Corps, who would you want it to be and why?

When President Obama was brand new to his presidency, we (i.e. SCA) got him and Michelle out to work (Michelle was the toughest of the two, by far!!) with crews in the DC area. I hope he reconnects with either SCA or any/all Conservation Corps to establish a lifetime excitement, connectivity, and support for the Corps Movement.


When not working, how do you like to relax and enjoy yourself?

I used to play a lot of guitar – I’ve got to get back to it when I retire – and, since I can no longer hike due to my partial paralysis I enjoy kayaking in Vermont State Parks (I have a favorite one) and otherwise reading about political issues (I'm a political junky) and watching sports (I actually used to be good at them when younger and not paralyzed).

2014 Corps Legacy Achievement Award Winner, Scott Weaver

Scott Weaver
SCA - the Student Conservation Association

 

Click here to read an Interview with
Scott Weaver

Scott Weaver, Senior Vice President for Government and Agency Affairs for the Student Conservation Association (SCA), has been a longtime advocate for Corps. He helped develop and pass the Public Lands Corps Act in the early 1990s and has been an ardent supporter of Corps in recent years in his work for the Public Lands Service Coalition.

Scott has spent the last 30 years serving SCA. Prior to his current position, he worked as Vice President of Programs, Director of SCA’s High School and Resource Assistant Programs, and he worked in the field as an SCA Conservation Work Crew Leader. Before joining SCA, Scott worked for the National Park Service in Yosemite National Park for nine years.

Scott serves on the Advisory Board of American Trails and is a member of the Association of National Park Rangers, the National Parks and Conservation Association, the Yosemite Fund, and the Public Lands Service Coalition.

Boiler Plate: 
Scott Weaver, Senior Vice President for Government and Agency Affairs for the Student Conservation Association (SCA), has been a longtime advocate for Corps. He helped develop and pass the Public Lands Corps Act in the early 1990s and has been an ardent supporter of Corps in recent years in his work for the Public Lands Service Coalition.

2014 Corps Legacy Achievement Award Winner, Leslie Wilkoff



Leslie Wilkoff
The Corps Network

 

Click here to Read an Interview with
Leslie Wilkoff 

Leslie began with the Human Environment Center in 1984 and transitioned to The Corps Network when it was created in 1985. Since the organization began, Leslie has taken on almost every responsibility possible at one time or another, and has become one of the most knowledgeable leaders in the Corps Movement, sought out for her wisdom, command of Corps history, and expertise in AmeriCorps programs and initiatives.

As Director of AmeriCorps Programs, Leslie Wilkoff leads The Corps Network's AmeriCorps Education Award Program (EAP). Leslie created TCN's AmeriCorps Program Manual as well as a document on nontraditional uses for AmeriCorps Education Awards. She also ensures compliance and provides technical assistance to TCN subgrantees in Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS) AmeriCorps grants.

Throughout her tenure Leslie has developed a cache of tools for national service and youth development programs and has emerged as one of the leaders of the EAP serving on numerous working groups for CNCS. She also provides training to subgrantees for the eGrants Portal on-line member management system. In addition, she helped develop and manages The Corps Network's Health Insurance Plan for Corpsmembers and AmeriCorps members.


 

Boiler Plate: 
Leslie began with the Human Environment Center in 1984 and transitioned to The Corps Network when it was created in 1985. Since the organization began, Leslie has taken on almost every responsibility possible at one time or another, and has become one of the most knowledgeable leaders in the Corps Movement, sought out for his wisdom, command of Corps history, and expertise in AmeriCorps programs and initiatives.

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