EarthCorps Selected for 300 Year Long Habitat Restoration Stewardship Project in Washington

From EarthCorps

EarthCorps was selected by the Commencement Bay Trustees to be the stewards of a cutting edge restoration fund to provide long-term maintenance, monitoring and community engagement at 17 restoration sites in and around Tacoma’s Commencement Bay for 300 years.

This collaborative partnership is seen as a model for the rest of the country to look to for long-term environmental stewardship. Trustees represent NOAA, US Fish and Wildlife Service, US Dept. of Interior, The Puyallup Tribe of Indians, the Muckleshoot Indian Tribe, and WA Dept. of Ecology. 

The restoration sites are part of an EPA cleanup and subsequent habitat restoration. In order for EarthCorps to conduct the work, we are EarthCorps has been entrusted with $4.9 million dollars to invest for the sole purpose of providing the annual funds required to ensure the long-term stewardship of these sites.

Read more on NOAA's website. 

Boiler Plate: 
EarthCorps was selected by the Commencement Bay Trustees to be the stewards of a cutting edge restoration fund to provide long-term maintenance, monitoring and community engagement at 17 restoration sites in and around Tacoma’s Commencement Bay for 300 years.

EarthCorps Featured in Seattle Times by "Fit for Life" Columnist

Benjamin Benschneider / The Seattle Times

Excerpted from the Seattle Times

Corps work: Get good exercise for the good Earth

Fit for Life columnist Nicole Tsong is all in for working hard and doing good for the planet by volunteering with EarthCorps, the nonprofit Seattle-based organization dedicated to environmental restoration and developing community leaders.

Special to The Seattle Times

BURIED DEEP in a thicket of sword ferns in Lincoln Park in West Seattle, wrestling with vine after vine of English ivy, I wished I had worn a heart monitor. Crouching in a forest and pulling out English ivy by the roots isn’t easy; I wanted to know exactly how hard I was working.

Unfortunately, I didn’t think ahead. So I relied on the fact that I was doing something good for the environment, and also the feelings in my legs, lower back and shoulders that told me weeding a forest for three hours or so is plain hard work.

Plenty of studies tell us that working out keeps us strong and elevates our mood, which can only be good for people around us. Most of us work out for the endorphins, to build strength, to get fit. Still, I don’t count going to the gym as public service.

Then there is EarthCorps. The nonprofit Seattle-based organization is dedicated to environmental restoration and developing community leaders, and its volunteer work requires physical effort for improving not only Lincoln Park but Magnuson Park in the North End and others scattered around Puget Sound. Working hard and doing good for the planet? Count me in.

Continue Reading

Boiler Plate: 
Fit for Life columnist Nicole Tsong is all in for working hard and doing good for the planet by volunteering with EarthCorps, the nonprofit Seattle-based organization dedicated to environmental restoration and developing community leaders.