The Corps Network in Hollywood: The Serve A Year Campaign Launch Event


On Monday – March 23, 2015 – The Corps Network participated in the launch event of ServiceNation’s Serve A Year campaign at the Jimmy Kimmel Live! studio in Los Angeles, CA.


Background Info:

Announced in the fall of 2014 at the annual meeting of the Clinton Global Initiative, Serve A Year is a campaign to unite national service organizations with some of the most influential voices in entertainment, business and technology in an effort to inspire young Americans to serve their country. The goal is that people will one day ask each other “where did you serve?” – similar to how we now ask each other “where did you go to college?”

To make national service a more prominent part of the American way of life, Serve A Year is focused on integrating national service into popular culture with the help of script writers, television and movie producers, celebrities, viral video stars and influential businesses. The campaign has already experienced success; AmeriCorps has been mentioned or written into the plotlines of popular TV shows including Parks & Recreation, True Detective, Melissa & Joey, and The Middle.  

Serve A Year is supported by innovative companies, including Airbnb, Tumblr, Comcast and NBCUniversal, as well as 18 of the country’s leading national service organizations. Along with YouthBuild USA, The Corps Network represents the Opportunity Youth pillar of the campaign, championing the idea that participating in national service can be a transformative experience for disconnected young people. 



The Launch Event:
 

Hosted at the Jimmy Kimmel Live! studio in Los Angeles, CA, the launch of the Serve A Year campaign included appearances by Jimmy Kimmel and Chelsea Clinton;  audience members included over 200 Hollywood executives, writers and producers, and senior corporate executives. The Corps Network was represented at the event by Marie Walker, Vice President of The Corps Network; Bruce Saito, Executive Director Emeritus of Los Angeles Conservation Corps (LACC) and a member of TCN’s Board of Directors; and several current and former LACC Corpsmembers. Kendrick Collins, an alumni of LACC, was one of three Corpsmembers to speak during the event about his national service experience.

After the launch event, Marie Walker and Kendrick Collins visited the studio’s green room to watch the filming of that evening’s episode of Jimmy Kimmel Live! During the taping, Jimmy Kimmel interviewed Chelsea Clinton about Serve A Year and the duo released a PSA about the campaign. 

Blog Slideshow: 

Secretary Jewell Visits Los Angeles to Promote Connecting Urban Youth to the Great Outdoors, Meets with LA Conservation Corps



Watch a video about Secretary Jewell's Youth Initiative

 

Click here to see photos of Secretary Jewell with LACC

Source: Press Release, Office of Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti

This week, Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell joined Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti to announce Los Angeles has been selected as one of eight pilot cities under the Urban Wildlife Refuge Initiative to connect urban youth with the great outdoors.  The announcement comes on the heels of President Obama’s fiscal year 2015 budget request last week, which supports the Department's youth initiative to inspire millions of young people to play, learn, serve and work outdoors through increased investments in the Department’s youth programs.

“As children become increasingly disconnected with nature, it is critical for the health of our economy and our public lands that we work to establish meaningful and deep connections between young people from every background and every community to the great outdoors,” said Secretary Jewell. “Creating opportunities for urban young people to get outdoors not only supports healthy lifestyles but it also helps spark a passion to be good stewards of nature that will last a lifetime.”

“Giving city kids access to outdoor experiences and exercise will undoubtedly make a lasting impact, and so I am excited that L.A. is partnering with the Department of the Interior through the Urban Wildlife Refuge Initiative,” said Mayor Garcetti. “Connecting L.A.'s youth with nature will enrich their lives, strengthen our communities, and increase our city's health.”



 

President Obama’s budget released last week proposes $50.6 million for Interior youth programs, which represents a $13.6 million (or 37 percent) increase from 2014. Included in the budget is an increase of $2.5 million for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Urban Wildlife Refuge Initiative, $8 million to expand opportunities for youth education and employment across the National Park Service and an additional $1 million in the Bureau of Indian Affairs for youth programs.

Prior to the announcement, students from Franklin High School led Jewell and Garcetti on a hike of the LA River and through Los Angeles State Historic Park where they discussed how the National Park Service and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service are partnering with local organizations to create opportunities to help urban students and families make connections with America’s federal, state and local public lands.

Thanks to a partnership with the Friends of the LA River, a mobile visitor and education center will soon bring the Los Angeles River to life for young people who might otherwise not establish a connection with nature.  A modified RV, the River Rover, will provide educational opportunities for families and children in one of the most diverse and densely populated regions of the country.

“Los Angeles is a national leader at engaging urban youth in nature and we hope what is happening here can serve as a model for other cities across the country,” said Jewell. “The partnership we have formed will allow us to bring young people to the river and the river to young people.” 

The River Rover, to be completed in April, will house interactive exhibits, including an interactive model of the LA River watershed. It is one of eight pilot projects sponsored by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service across the country. Examples of other projects include working with schools in New Haven, CT, to create a network of wildlife-friendly habitat oases and habitat improvements in municipal parks, schoolyards, and vacant lots to establishing nature-learning and engagement opportunities in urban neighborhoods in Chicago.

In an attempt to help bridge the growing disconnect between young people and the great outdoors, Secretary Jewell last October launched an ambitious youth initiative to inspire millions of young people to play, learn, serve and work outdoors. The goals of the youth initiative include:

Play: Interior will develop or enhance outdoor recreation partnerships in a total of 50 cities over four years to create new, systemic opportunities for outdoor play for more than 10 million young people.

Learn: Provide educational opportunities to at least 10 million of the nation’s K-12 student population annually. In addition to welcoming students into nature’s classroom, we are developing and strengthening new online education resources, to reach more students.

Serve: Engage 1 million volunteers annually on public lands, effectively tripling the numbers we have now. We know that many more people are interested in volunteering at national parks, wildlife refuges and public lands, but there are often insufficient staff resources to coordinate them. In order to achieve the volunteer goal, we will place a renewed emphasis on volunteer coordination and management.

Work: To develop the next generation of lifelong conservation stewards and ensure our own skilled and diverse workforce pipeline, Interior will provide 100,000 work & training opportunities to young people within our bureaus and through public-private partnerships. As part of this effort, we aim to raise an additional $20 million to support the youth work and training opportunities.

Los Angeles is also one of 18 pilots for the Urban Waters Federal Partnership – a coalition of 13 federal agencies working to revitalize urban waterfronts and open spaces in cities, leading to healthier and more prosperous communities all over the country.

LA Conservation Corps After School Program Partners with NASA

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Story and photo from the LA Conservation Corps Newsletter, Volume 3 | Issue 9 - September 27, 2013 

School is back in session for our 4,500 participants in the After School Program (ASP). For the first time this year, ASP is partnering with NASA's Best STEM program at all 16 elementary and middle schools. The program is part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's tradition of supporting educators who play a key role in preparing, inspiring, exciting, encouraging, and nurturing the young minds of today who will be the workforce of tomorrow by attracting and retaining students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM disciplines.

ASP students pictured above at John Adams Middle School are working on the "Build a Satellite to Orbit the Moon" design challenge project. Students must design and build a satellite that meets specific size and mass constraints.  It is required to carry a combination of camera, gravity probes and heat sensors to investigate the moon's surface.  The satellite must also pass a 1-meter Drop Test without any parts falling off. The objective is for students to demonstrate an understanding of the Engineering Design Process while utilizing each stage to successfully complete a team challenge.

For more information about the After School Program, please contact Da'Lana Walker at dwalker@lacorps.org

LA Conservation Corps After School Program Partners with NASA

null


Story and photo from the LA Conservation Corps Newsletter, Volume 3 | Issue 9 - September 27, 2013 

School is back in session for our 4,500 participants in the After School Program (ASP). For the first time this year, ASP is partnering with NASA's Best STEM program at all 16 elementary and middle schools. The program is part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's tradition of supporting educators who play a key role in preparing, inspiring, exciting, encouraging, and nurturing the young minds of today who will be the workforce of tomorrow by attracting and retaining students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM disciplines.

ASP students pictured above at John Adams Middle School are working on the "Build a Satellite to Orbit the Moon" design challenge project. Students must design and build a satellite that meets specific size and mass constraints.  It is required to carry a combination of camera, gravity probes and heat sensors to investigate the moon's surface.  The satellite must also pass a 1-meter Drop Test without any parts falling off. The objective is for students to demonstrate an understanding of the Engineering Design Process while utilizing each stage to successfully complete a team challenge.

For more information about the After School Program, please contact Da'Lana Walker at dwalker@lacorps.org

LA Conservation Corps Plants Over 1,000 Trees Across Los Angeles County

 

Trees are going up in and around Los Angeles thanks to the LA Conservation Corps. Read below to learn about how LACC recently participated in two local tree planting projects.

Taken from Around the Corps, the LACC newsletter, Vol. 3 Issue 3


SEA Lab Corpsmembers plant over 1,000 trees in Lawndale

This month, SEA Lab corpsmembers participated in a tree planting ceremony at a local dog park to celebrate our partnership with the City of Lawndale. City officials joined SEA Lab Director Brent Scheiwe and his crew to plant three Sweet Bay trees. Pictured above from the left (holding shovels) are Mayor Pro Tem Larry Rudolph, Councilmember Pat Kearny, Councilmember Jim Osborne and Mayor Harold Hofmann.  

Corpsmembers will plant 100 trees in the City of Lawndale during the month of March as part of the South Coast Air Quality Management District's Green House Gas Reduction grant. The event also marked another milestone, as Corpsmembers planted their one-thousandth tree for the project. Only 200 remain to be planted under the grant.


LACC helps plant trees at Special Education Center in San Pedro

In honor of California Arbor Week, corpsmembers from our East LA Center teamed up with volunteers from Fresh & Easy and Uniliver to plant 14 Shrubby Yew Pines on the campus of Willenberg Special Education Center School in San Pedro.  The Willenberg School serves over 500 students aged 5 to 22 who are moderately to severely handicapped and/or autistic.

A total of 14 volunteers came out on March 14th to work with four LA Corpsmembers and staff.  The trees were planted around the School's newly built playground to provide shade to the area.  Once the trees were planted, students helped water the trees.  The Willenberg School was very appreciative of our planting efforts and thankful that we included their students in this unique planting opportunity.  The LA Corps looks forward to partnering with Fresh & Easy to continue greening our local schools.

LA Conservation Corps Helps Build a Biofiltration System at Local Field Laboratory

 


Unveiling of the Santa Susana biofilter

Los Angeles Conservation Corps recently attended the opening of a new biofiltration system at Santa Susana Field Laboratory. LACC Corpsmembers helped construct the system. Read below for more information.

Taken from At the Corps, the LACC Newsletter, Vol. 3 Issue 3

The Boeing Company, a panel of internationally recognized surface water experts, representatives from the LA Conservation Corps, Pollinator Partnership and members of the public were on-hand last week during the unveiling of Boeing's new biofiltration system which harnesses natural processes to treat storm water runoff while promoting pollinator habitats at the Santa Susana Field Laboratory, a former rocket engine test and energy research site.

"Our new biofiltration system supports Boeing's overall strategy to use natural processes to treat storm water and is one component of the company's comprehensive surface water treatment programs," said Paul Costa, Boeing's environmental operations and compliance manager. 

The new $600,000 biofilter uses natural settling, plant uptake, soil processes and specially designed filter media to capture sediment and pollutants before releasing cleaner water back into the watershed.

 

Boeing partnered with the LA Conservation Corps to plant over 2000 California native plants and collaborated with the Pollinator Partnership to ensure the landscape would support diverse pollinators. The result is a biofilter that acts like a natural ecosystem.

Corpsmembers worked on the project for eight weeks, beginning with a day of safety training and a tour of the facilities. In addition to the planting, corpsmembers created a "learning walk," including 350 feet of walking path, 2 benches and interpretive signage that educates visitors about biofiltration.

Since acquiring its portion of the site in 1996, Boeing has made significant progress toward cleanup and restoration and is moving toward the company's goal of preserving the site as open space parkland. For more information, visit www.boeing.com/santasusana. To see more photos of the project, please visit the LACC Facebook page.

2005 Corpsmember of the Year: Jessica Martinez

 

Jessica Martinez was paroled out of the Youth Authority system a month before applying to the Los Angeles Conservation Corps.  Her primary goal in the Corps was to obtain her high school diploma, and most importantly not to make the same mistakes that she did in the past.  A year later, Jessica has received her diploma, graduated with high honors and has earned a specialist position as a Recruitment and Training Assistant with LACC.  Through her time with the Corps she has made great strides, including receiving a college scholarship and being elected by her peers to the Leadership Team, over which she now presides as president. 

--“I didn’t realize, until I came to the Corps, that I have choices, which have consequences, and if I make positive choices I can make a better life for myself despite the actions of others.”

(written in 2005)