Waders in the Water Certified Corpsmembers Partner to Help Private Land Owners 

Waders in the Water graduates from the New Jersey Youth Corps Phillipsburg restore a riparian buffer 
 

Submitted by Luke Frazza
Trout Headwaters, Inc.

In another creative private-public partnership, Waders in the Water (WitW) graduates from the New Jersey Youth Corps Phillipsburg partnered with the New Jersey Audubon and the Sussex County Municipal Utilities Authority/Wallkill River Watershed Management Group to work with private landowners in the Highlands region to restore habitat and improve water quality. The planting project will help reduce excess phosphorous, considered by the EPA, "one of America's most widespread, costly and challenging environmental problems."  

Register Here for the Waders in the Water class

Graduates have participated in the WitW interactive, webinar-delivered training that instructs students in:

  • Common industry tools, techniques, and processes 
  • Workplace safety
  • Proven, Practical, & Innovative Habitat Enhancement 

Certified graduates have a path to projects, jobs, and careers in the $10B/Yr. restoration economy and certified corps are better positioned to participate in the growing number of Public-private Restoration partnerships

What creative private-public partnerships await your trained and certified corpsmembers?
 


The next two-day training takes place:      

Mon.  June 20, 2016 10:00 AM - 1:00 PM EDT

Tues. June 21, 2016 10:00 AM - 1:00 PM EDT

This Training meets 2 times. Attendees are expected to attend both sessions.

 
Class size is limited so Register Here Today!

Contact info@troutheadwaters  with any questions.

Initiative trains local youth in coastal restoration to assist in Gulf Oil Spill recovery

Through Gulf Coast Restoration Initiative, teens and young adults to gain skills in aquatic resource management and coastal habitat monitoring

Partnership for 21st Century Conservation Service Corps Announces "100 Projects to Restore America"

EarthCorps Selected for 300 Year Long Habitat Restoration Stewardship Project in Washington

From EarthCorps

EarthCorps was selected by the Commencement Bay Trustees to be the stewards of a cutting edge restoration fund to provide long-term maintenance, monitoring and community engagement at 17 restoration sites in and around Tacoma’s Commencement Bay for 300 years.

This collaborative partnership is seen as a model for the rest of the country to look to for long-term environmental stewardship. Trustees represent NOAA, US Fish and Wildlife Service, US Dept. of Interior, The Puyallup Tribe of Indians, the Muckleshoot Indian Tribe, and WA Dept. of Ecology. 

The restoration sites are part of an EPA cleanup and subsequent habitat restoration. In order for EarthCorps to conduct the work, we are EarthCorps has been entrusted with $4.9 million dollars to invest for the sole purpose of providing the annual funds required to ensure the long-term stewardship of these sites.

Read more on NOAA's website. 

Boiler Plate: 
EarthCorps was selected by the Commencement Bay Trustees to be the stewards of a cutting edge restoration fund to provide long-term maintenance, monitoring and community engagement at 17 restoration sites in and around Tacoma’s Commencement Bay for 300 years.

Utah Conservation Corps Featured in Nature Conservancy Magazine Cover Story about Escalante River Watershed Partnership

 

In their most recent magazine, The Nature Conservancy chose to make their feature story about their work with a broader group of partners, known as the Escalante River Watershed Partnership. The partnership is working to protect the Escalante River in southeast Utah. 

The cover of the magazine shows a Utah Conservation Corps AmeriCorps member, and within the article other Corpsmembers are quoted and shown in photos. Several other Corps have been involved with restoration efforts and joint trainings for the Escalante and Dolores Rivers, including Southwest Conservation CorpsCanyon Country Youth Corps, and Western Colorado Conservation Corps. Crews from the Corps are specifically helping to eradicate non-native Russian olive and tamarisk trees along the river. These invasive tree species thrive in poor soil and outcompete native plant species, damaging the river’s ecosystems. Late last year, The Nature Conservancy presented an award to several Corps for their work on the Dolores River, where restoration projects are also underway.

In addition to reading the article, you can watch a video about the partnership produced by The Nature Conservancy.

Service and Conservation Corps Will Soon Add “Waders in the Water”

The Corps Network is working with Trout Headwaters, Inc. on a new training program to put “Waders in the Water.”  THI president Michael Sprague (pictured) says his company is looking forward to readying America’s youth and veterans for work along our waterways. 

200 Jobs to be Created Through the "National Parks of New York Harbor Conservation and Resiliency Corps"


Secretary Jewell Announces Youth Corps to Help Restore New York, New Jersey Parks After Hurricane Sandy 

Taken from a Department of the Interior press release - May 30, 2013 (click here, or scroll down for full press release) 
 

On Thursday, May 30, Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell announced the launch of the “National Parks of New York Harbor Conservation and Resiliency Corps.” This program, created through a partnership between the City of New York and the Student Conservation Association (SCA), will create about 200 jobs for young people to participate in Hurricane Sandy clean-up and restoration efforts. The Corps will initially focus on Gateway National Recreation Area and neighboring city parklands in Jamaica Bay, Queens. Their goal is to assist in recovery and damage mitigation throughout national park sites in New York City and New Jersey. These Corpsmembers will serve as role models for President Obama’s ongoing efforts to build a 21st Century Service Conservation Corps (21 CSC), based off President Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s successful Civilian Conservation Corps of the 1930s.

2013 will serve as a pilot year of what is expected to be a multi-year program. The Corps was created through a public-private partnership, with funding from Hurricane Sandy Restoration and Recovery funds and matching SCA funds. American Eagle Outfitters is sponsoring 25 of the 200 corps members.

“President Obama has made Hurricane Sandy response efforts a top priority for his Administration,” said Jewell. “This youth corps will not only strengthen recovery and mitigation efforts in our National Parks throughout the region, but it will also serve as a model for the power of public-private partnerships to boost youth employment and connect young people to the great outdoors.”

 


The “National Parks of New York Harbor Conservation & Resiliency Corps” expected to create 200 jobs for youth in the region

QUEENS, NY — As part of President Obama’s commitment to expand employment opportunities for youth, Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell today launched the “National Parks of New York Harbor Conservation and Resiliency Corps,” a partnership with the City of New York and the Student Conservation Association (SCA) that will provide approximately 200 jobs for young people in 2013 to participate in Hurricane Sandy recovery and clean-up efforts.

2013 will serve as a pilot year for what is expected to be a multi-year program for youth and young adults from around the region to assist in the response, recovery and mitigation of Hurricane Sandy damage within the national park units and their partner sites in New York City and New Jersey. The Corps will initially focus on Gateway National Recreation Area and adjoining city parklands at Jamaica Bay. Secretary Jewell’s announcement followed a Tuesday visit by President Obama to the New Jersey Shore, where he viewed rebuilding and recovery efforts underway.

“President Obama has made Hurricane Sandy response efforts a top priority for his Administration,” said Jewell. “This youth corps will not only strengthen recovery and mitigation efforts in our National Parks throughout the region, but it will also serve as a model for the power of public-private partnerships to boost youth employment and connect young people to the great outdoors.”

“America’s national parks are unrivaled inspirational assets and the passion of America’s youth is our most powerful resource,” stated Dale Penny, President & CEO of SCA, which is managing the resiliency corps. “Local students are telling us they are ready to do whatever it takes to help heal their community, and that pride and resiliency will prove stronger than any hurricane.” Youth interested in applying to the program can do so here.

The program is a public-private partnership, with funding from Hurricane Sandy Restoration and Recovery funds and matching SCA funds. American Eagle Outfitters is sponsoring 25 of the 200 corps members.

These 200 members of the new parks resiliency corps are in addition to the approximately 200 workers that New York City Parks Commissioner Veronica M. White announced on May 13 as part of the “Jamaica Bay/Rockaway Parks Restoration Corps,” which was funded by an emergency grant from the U.S. and New York departments of labor.

“We are proud to partner with the U.S. Department of the Interior and the National Park Service to ensure our region’s recovery from the damages inflicted by Hurricane Sandy,” said White. “The creation of this new National Parks of New York Harbor Conservancy and Resiliency Corps, combined with our Jamaica Bay/Rockaway Parks Restoration Corps, is putting hundreds of New Yorkers to work while preserving some of our city’s richest ecological open spaces.”

“In addition to cleaning up damage from the hurricane, the National Parks of New York Harbor Conservation and Resiliency Corps will be restoring habitat, rebuilding trails and other projects,” National Park Service Director Jonathan B. Jarvis said. “These efforts not only help the parks recover from the effects of Hurricane Sandy, but also begin to mitigate the effects of future storms and sea level rise.”

In July 2012, New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg and then-Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar signed an agreement between the city and the National Park Service for cooperative management of parklands. The partnership enables New York City parks and the National Park Service to work on each other’s lands, co-mingle resources and undertake joint planning efforts.

When Hurricane Sandy ravaged the East Coast on October 29, 2012, the storm affected nearly 70 national park sites. In the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, the country's various conservation corps have played a vital role in efforts on-the-ground in the disaster-affected communities.

The newest corps members will serve as role models for the Obama Administration’s ongoing efforts to build a 21st Century Conservation Service Corps, called 21 CSC. Building on the legacy of President Roosevelt’s Civilian Conservation Corps during the Great Depression in the 1930s, the 21 CSC aims to help young people – including diverse low-income, underserved and at-risk youth, as well as returning veterans – gain valuable training and work experience while accomplishing needed conservation and restoration service on public lands and waters.

Since 2009, when Interior established its Office of Youth in the Great Outdoors, the department and its agencies have built one of the largest and most visible youth programs at the national level, employing more than 84,000 youth through direct hires and partnerships.

Last week, Secretary Jewell announced that the Interior Department expects to hire approximately 17,000 young people to work on public lands this year.

Secretary Jewell Kicks Off National Fishing and Boating Week with Earth Conservation Corps

On Monday, June 3, Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell joined U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Deputy Director Rowan Gould at Earth Conservation Corps’s Pump House location on the Anacostia River to kick off a day of recreational and educational activities in recognition of National Fishing and Boating Week. Over 200 students from D.C. metro area elementary and middle schools had the chance to enjoy fishing and boating activities with Secretary Jewell, and learn about fish and wildlife conservation through hands-on activities.

Also participating in the event were Johnny Morris, founder of Bass Pro Shops, and Bob Nixon, founder of Earth Conservation Corps. The staff of Earth Conservation Corps was on hand to demonstrate the organization’s live “osprey-cam,” and introduce visitors to birds of prey from their Raptor Education Program.

The event was sponsored by 13 local and federal government agencies, businesses, and nonprofits. 
 


Secretary Jewell, holding a bird from Earth Conservation Corps's Raptor Education Program, pictured with Daryl Wallace, ECC Media Arts Director 



A boat that took students and guests for a ride down the Anacostia



Earth Conservation Corps Staff Daryl Wallace and Kellie Bolinder giving a demonstration



A fire boat on the Anacostia River puts on a demonstration for the event

EarthCorps Participates in Tidal Wetland Restoration in Effort to Increase Wetland Greenhouse Gas Sequestration

Restoring tidal wetlands: pioneering a biocarbon solution at the Snohomish River Delta

By Keeley O’Connell, Senior Project Manager, EarthCorps

Tidal wetlands provide great potential to sequester and store greenhouse gases. Restore Americas Estuaries and EarthCorps, with funding from NOAA’s Office of Habitat Conservation and support from Western Washington University, are investigating the carbon sequestration value of tidal wetlands.

The goal of EarthCorps’ effort is to assist locally with Restore America’s Estuaries national effort to develop new market and policy-based incentives that leverage carbon offsets to fund the conservation and restoration of coastal wetlands.  We are losing these wetlands at an unsustainable rate of up to 3 percent globally per year.

Most carbon offset science and projects have focused on forestry or agriculture; however, research suggests that coastal wetlands sequester carbon at rates 3-5 times greater than temperate forests. Coastal wetlands represent significant stores of soil carbon, accumulated over centuries and millennia. In addition, some tidal marshes have the potential to reduce emissions of other greenhouse gases, such as methane. 

...EarthCorps’ Coastal Blue Carbon project in the Snohomish River delta and estuary is the first in a nationwide effort to develop protocols for greenhouse gas sequestration through tidal wetland habitat restoration. This area is ideal because it contains a full spectrum of wetland types in one watershed. It also has a suite of shovel-ready restoration projects. This project will deliver site-specific, field-verified carbon values.  Field data will contribute to the growing body of literature on wetland carbon pools.

Click here to read more

A KUPU Intern Shares his Passion for Nature and Photography

 

From KUPU - Hawaii Youth Conservation Corps 

Chris Wong is one of Kupu’s current 2012-2013 EIP interns (the EIP Program falls under the Hawaii Youth Conservation Corps). He is based on Hawaii Island, working with the USDA Forest Service. Chris has played an active role in keeping EIP interns connected 

throughout their term of service, and is currently organizing the second-ever AmeriCorps EIP gathering on the Big Island, at Hakalau Forest and Kanakaleonui Bird Corridor atop Mauna Kea. Chris is an avid wildlife and nature photographer as well -- check out

 a few of his photos from the field (scrolling photos at the top of the page - all photos owned by Chris Wong). 

Throughout his EIP internship Chris has spent a lot of time in the field doing conservation-related management activities, however the most rewarding part of his experience to date has been the opportunity to educate local youth about conserving Hawaii’s natural resources and native species. Kupu asked Chris to describe his internship thus far, and here is what he had to say:

“Since beginning my internship at the US Forest Service, I’ve worked with many projects. I’ve floundered head high in an uluhe/clidemia forest, measured native trees in Kona, tracked rats in the Saddle Road Kipuka and even helped restore the forest at Hakalau. Being in the field is definitely enjoyable and so has applying my horticulture degree in the greenhouse, but the most enjoyable and rewarding experience has been the educational experience. I currently help out with a project called Teaching Change and have taken on my own project called Ulu Lehulehu- the Million Ohia Initiative. Both projects involve working with students in local schools and there, I get to see them excited about the forest. This is especially true with Ulu Lehulehu; I’ve been doing summer internships for four summers now, but being able to pass on knowledge to the next generation is what sets this internship apart from the previous ones. A recent presentation (on March 5th 2013) was no exception. The 6th graders seemed so excited to be planting their own ʻŌhiʻa seeds The fact that they were answering all of my questions correctly and throwing a couple at me told me that the students were excited about ʻŌhiʻa too. To top it off, after the presentation, the teacher telling me that reviewing the scientific method actually covered what he would be doing in a couple of weeks brought it all together and told me that at least today, I did something right.”

Chris is a great example of someone who has found an interest in the environment, and took advantage of the stepping stone-like pathway Kupu has created. He joined HYCC in 2008 as a Gateway team member, returned in 2009 as a Frontiers intern, and is now halfway to finishing his 2012 EIP internship. Chris graduated from the University of Hawaii at Hilo with a bachelor’s degree in Horticulture, and has just been accepted to the University of Washington’s Master of Environmental Horticulture program. Congratulations Chris, Kupu’s March Spotlight!

 

 

 

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